ABOUT this guide
I designed this photography guide primarily as your an online reference for landscape photographers, for beginners and professionals. It contains basic or vital information to help you get started. You'll find the embedded google maps with easy enough to follow instructions, my personally curated photo maps with viewpoints and directions of sunset or sunrise.

I've personally followed and been to places I talked about in this photography guide.

If your time is short and you're not sure where exactly to go, here's the trail, which overflows with beautiful locations and stunning scenery that won't allow anybody to stay indifferent.

I've assigned each location with the number of stars that I'd personally give it: three stars *** -- a must-visit location, two stars ** -- a location that you probably don't want to miss, and one star * -- an optional photo point, which gives an interesting shooting perspective to the scenery nearby.


Each location has driving directions from the nearest town, some general information about a place being described, and my photography recommendations. A few points that I find particularly interesting contain some historical information, interesting facts about the place, and possibly a few suggestions about how to enjoy the optimal experience.
I've assigned each location with the number of stars that I'd personally give it:

  • three stars *** -- a must-visit location
  • two stars ** -- a location that you probably don't want to miss
  • one star * -- an optional photo point, which gives an interesting shooting perspective to the scenery nearby
    • Some points on the routes are marked with a special drone icon. This means that aerial photography is recommended in these locations. Before fly, please check the local drone regulations in advance.
    • Some points on the routes are marked with a special icon that prohibits flying by drones. This means that aerial photography is not permitted in these areas. But the drone rules change regularly, please stay tuned for updates.
    • Using the guide, you will find some information points. These points are interesting mainly as a touristic and cultural location. You can walk there, look for interesting angles, take pictures. I am not giving any specific recommendations for shooting here.
    HOW TO USE PHOTOGRAPHY RECOMMENDATION MAPS
    As you all know, there's no photography without light. So it's really important to figure out where that light is coming from. When doing outdoor photography, we have to work with what's on the table -- the sun. Knowing the sun and what it will be in advance makes a photographer's job easier. That's exactly why I've included the maps for all (or most) of the locations in this guide, so you know exactly where to look, stand, or aim your camera.
      While the sun always rises in the east and sets in the west, this knowledge (however basic and essential it might be) sometimes is not enough. First of all, how exactly easterly it rises or westerly it sets depends on the time of the year. All the maps are drawn for a particular season. Remember that some images can only be taken at certain times of the year, so if you attempt to use the map in the other season, it just might not work.

      While I welcome experimentation, ingenuity, and creativity, you need to have the basics of where to start or where to look at.

      Looking at the maps that I drew for each location, take note of the direction from either sunset or sunrise. Aim your camera into the direction of the sunrise if you arrive at dawn and would like to capture the rising sun, aim your camera in sunset direction if you arrive at your location when the sun is about to set. All pictures have a compass in the corner for you to understand which direction is meant. Some of those -- have additional photo points that show the preferable or recommended shooting range that I advise you to explore and experiment with.
        There are several mobile apps available (e.g. TPE) that you can choose from to get an almost exact approximation of the direction/timing of the sun, however, total reliability on those apps in the mountains is unnecessary or, at times, difficult.
          There are a few more things to say about lighting and the best timing to shoot the landscape:

          • First of all, if you see on the photo map or in the description that the location you're about to get to is a sunrise location, you'd better rise early, before dawn, and arrive at the viewpoint 30-40 minutes before sunrise.

          • Now, if you see the location is primarily a sunset location, you have to arrive 1,5-2 hours before sunset. This is called a golden hour.

          • After sunset, approximately 10 to 15 minutes, there might be something that we call a "hue," when the sunlight's color temperature decreases making the sunlight assume a golden or reddish hue. Then, for one more hour after sunset, you might observe a "silver hour," illuminating the landscape with bluish-purple colors.

          Having said that, you don't need to be at each destination or viewpoint for four hours or more -- you have to follow the hunch and your common practical sense -- if the weather changes, or you're tired, probably it's not worth it, and you can try again or follow the next photo point. Stay safe and take care of yourself above all.